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Edward Ester

Edward Ester
  • Assistant Professor
  • Department of Psychology
  • 561-297-1278
  • eester@fau.edu
  • Boca Raton - Behavioral Science, BS-12, BS 323

Education

Ph.D, University of Oregon

Research Interests

  • Visual Perception, Attention, and Short-term Memory
  • Categorization
  • Decision Making

Research Description 

Our lab studies the neural mechanisms that allow us to rapidly perceive and make sense out of the world around us. The long-term goal of our research to understand how the visual system efficiently selects incoming sensory signals in the service of flexible behavior and efficient decision making, and to understand these capacities are disrupted in different disease states (e.g., ADHD). Some recent questions we’ve been working on include:

How do contextual factors influence (a) what information is selected from the environment, and (b) how this information is represented and prioritized across the visual processing hierarchy?

  • How are sensory inputs mapped onto existing knowledge and concepts? How do recently activated concepts influence how sensory information is processed?
  • How do the contents of memory influence what sensory inputs are selected for further processing?

 We approach these questions using a mixture of behavioral testing, computational modeling, and non-invasive measurements of human brain activity (primarily EEG and fMRI).

Recent Publications

Sprague, T.C., Ester, E.F., Serences, J.T. (2016) Restoring latent visual working memory representations in human cortex. Neuron 91, 694-707
Ester, E.F., Sutterer, D.W., Serences, J.T., Awh, E. (2016) Feature-selective attentional modulations in human frontoparietal cortex. Journal of Neuroscience 36, 8188-8199
Ester E.F., Sprague, T.C., Serences, J.T. (2015) Parietal and frontal cortex encode stimulus-specific mnemonic representations during visual working memory. Neuron 87, 893-905
Sprague T.C., Ester, E.F., Serences, J.T. (2014) Reconstructions of information in visual spatial working memory degrade with memory load. Current Biology 24, 2174-2180.
Ester E.F., Klee, D., Awh, E. (2014) Visual crowding cannot be wholly explained by feature pooling. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception & Performance 40, 1022-1033
Ester E.F., Anderson, D.E., Serences J.T., Awh, E. (2013) A neural measure of precision in visual working memory. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 25, 754-761

Scholarly Activities

Sprague, T.C., Ester, E.F., Serences, J.T. (2016) Restoring latent visual working memory representations in human cortex. Neuron 91, 694-707
Ester, E.F., Sutterer, D.W., Serences, J.T., Awh, E. (2016) Feature-selective attentional modulations in human frontoparietal cortex. Journal of Neuroscience 36, 8188-8199
Ester E.F., Sprague, T.C., Serences, J.T. (2015) Parietal and frontal cortex encode stimulus-specific mnemonic representations during visual working memory. Neuron 87, 893-905
Sprague T.C., Ester, E.F., Serences, J.T. (2014) Reconstructions of information in visual spatial working memory degrade with memory load. Current Biology 24, 2174-2180.
Ester E.F., Klee, D., Awh, E. (2014) Visual crowding cannot be wholly explained by feature pooling. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception & Performance 40, 1022-1033
Ester E.F., Anderson, D.E., Serences J.T., Awh, E. (2013) A neural measure of precision in visual working memory. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 25, 754-761

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